Most of the gang left Barcelona in the morning, but I stayed on for another day because I haven’t been here before. I decided to take the touristy hop on and off Barcelona city tour for €27 because I was pretty damn tired from the lack of sleep. I would’ve walked around to explore the city if I were in a better state.

View from somewhere near the Jardins de Miramar.
View from somewhere near the Jardins de Miramar.

There are 2 routes, and I started on the less popular and absolutely boring West route. Even after taking the other route, I vow never to take these buses again. About 80% of their stops are insignificant attractions. Each route takes about 2 hours to complete, and it only goes in 1 direction. So most tourists just sit through the entire thing for a drive-by type of sight seeing. I recommend that you just save the money, buy a T10 card (€9.95 for 10 metro journeys), and make your way to the 5 or 6 important ones. (Don’t worry about asking for directions too. The Spanish here speak decent English and are polite towards tourists!) Sorely regret not doing that, and I vow to return and do Barcelona justice.

The never-ending construction of Sagrada Família.
The never-ending construction of Sagrada Família.

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It’s a staggering sight simply because it’s bizarre. A mad man’s dream, an over-pious follower’s insane homage to his belief. I don’t think it’s beautiful on the outside because there’s too much going on. Gaudi, girrrrl, you’ve got to edit. The whole thing looks like termite hills to me.

But it’s so different on the inside! I actually teared a little when I stepped in. It was absolutely serene, and so immensely different in style compared to the churches I’ve seen around Europe. There was a lot going on with the interiors as well, but the symmetry and attention to detail just blew me away.

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Almost every surface area was decorated.

Europe loves its high ceilings, and the Sagrada Família emphasised that with structural columns that reached up and then branched out like trees to hold the roof up.

My favourite part of all is this corner where the stained glass windows cause jewel-toned rays to be cast into the church. It’s so bloody gorgeous in afternoon.

Falling asleep through the rest of the route.
After that climax, I spent the rest of the route falling asleep at the back of the bus.

Because the bus tour was so unsatisfying, I forced myself to venture out again after dinner and a short nap. I was actually astounded at my ability to wake up after 45 minutes despite not having a wink of sleep the entire day and night before.

There was just an hour of sunlight left, so I made my way to Park Guell, another Gaudi attraction. I didn’t pay to go in as there wasn’t much time left, so I just walked around it.

View on the way up.
View on the way up.

It’s nice and quiet at this hour. The winding paths were devoid of tourists and filled with runners and locals taking an evening stroll with their dogs.

I looked out at this view and felt so, so sad that I had to leave the next morning.
I looked out at this view and felt so, so sad that I had to leave the next morning.

Just look at the size of Barcelona! You’ve got to spend at least 2 to 3 days exploring the city. And there are also day trips to take if you fancy being up in the surrounding mountains.

Ended the trip off with a €2 pistachio gelato at the slightly bohemian neighbourhood of Garcia, where locals still sit around with drinks in hand at 11pm on a Sunday.

I’ll be back.

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